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Design Concepts

Design Concepts

Design Options

“The praise needs to go to the councils of the day who stepped up to do the Clouds of Change report and then supported SEFC through its steps … It was a combination of strong leadership, commitment, clear vision, excellent technical knowledge and community buy-in.”

Mark Holland, Principal, HB Lanarc and former Planner, City of Vancouver

The following set of illustrations are a sample of the concept drawings that were created during the visioning process for Southeast False Creek.

The Creekside Landing Plan, April 1997, Stanley Kwok Consulting.enlarge

The Creekside Landing Plan, April 1997, Stanley Kwok Consulting.

This drawing is taken from a plan submitted to council by development consultant Stanley Kwok at the behest of the City of Vancouver Real Estate Department. Kwok’s submission featured residential towers of 20 or more storeys, mimicking in many ways the pattern of development on the north side of False Creek. The logic behind this high-density plan was that the proposed model would be the only way to generate enough capital to pay for the cleanup of this polluted site.

Pedestrian Mews, 1998, Taylor, Baker, McGarva, Hart /VIA Architects.enlarge

Pedestrian Mews, 1998, Taylor, Baker, McGarva, Hart /VIA Architects.

This illustration, submitted to the City of Vancouver by Baker McGarva Hart/VIA Architecture, depicts the character of the pedestrian mews. The fundamentals of patterning the street network as envisioned by the designers were “Pizza, Grandma and Garbage.” These keywords capture the essence of the diverse activities that contribute to the vibrancy of a pedestrian street: chance social encounters, ball games, storm water management and pizza delivery.

Peak and Valley, 1998, Taylor, Baker, McGarva, Hart /VIA Architects. enlarge

Peak and Valley, 1998, Taylor, Baker, McGarva, Hart /VIA Architects.

Stemming from the visioning statements in the urban design guidelines for SEFC, this drawing emphasizes a range of different housing types and building forms. Borrowing from Vancouver’s successes in South False Creek, the West End and downtown, Baker McGarva Hart/VIA Architecture’s proposed peaks and valleys support the diversity of lifestyles and life cycles within a community. The drawing stems from the idea that one key to a successful urban community is the experience of the “sweep of the sun,” which requires a full repertoire of open spaces, building shapes and solar access – both direct and reflecting off walls and windows.

First Avenue ‘High' Street, 1998, Taylor, Baker, McGarva, Hart /VIA Architects.enlarge

First Avenue "High" Street

Naturalized Shoreline, 1998, Taylor, Baker, McGarva, Hart /VIA Architects.enlarge

Naturalized Shoreline, 1998, Taylor, Baker, McGarva, Hart /VIA Architects.

Domtar Reuse, 1998, Taylor, Baker, McGarva, Hart /VIA Architects.enlarge

Salt Building Reuse, 1998, Taylor, Baker, McGarva, Hart /VIA Architects.

Bob Worden, 1998enlarge

Bob Worden, 1998

This rendering, a watercolour painted by architect Bob Worden, was created following the 1998 SEFC design charrette. It shows a view along First Avenue, demonstrating its development as a mixed-use high street. The image captures the renovated Salt Building and features light rail transit with residential towers in the background.



BANNER IMAGE
The Creekside Landing Plan, April 1997, Stanley Kwok Consulting.